SEO is not dead

It seems to be the trend of late to write obituaries for SEO, to decry the end of SEO, and what seems to be a good riddance thrown in from a few...but it's not dead. SEO isn't even ill.

And it’s not dying either. It’s not even particularly ill.

It seems to be the trend of late to write obituaries for SEO, to decry the end of SEO, and what seems to be a good riddance thrown in from a few.

“All that really matters is good design and good content” is the mantra you often hear, but it operates the same way as the rhetoric, “if you build it they will come”. But they won’t come if they can’t find you.

Of course, good design and quality content is essential but everybody knows that. As Marcus Kernohan noted from his review of Brighton SEO, “content quality is non-negotiable”. When most people think of SEO they think about the old SEO. The black hat tricks: keyword stuffing, doorway pages, and invisible text or sending out spammy emails asking people to link to you and in return you would place a link somewhere on your site.

Now you could say that type of SEO is dead, as search engines have become increasingly more sophisticated it’s doubtful it’s even possible to trick them for any real length of time.

Whereas now SEO is a combination of user experience, web design, PR, inbound marketing, social media and more. It takes all these elements and tries to get the best out of them to give the visitor exactly what they want as quickly as possible.

The google algorithm updates have been successful in combating irrelevant search results and replacing them with good quality, popular and valuable search results. We can thank Panda, Penguin and Pidgeon for that.

So, if SEO is in fact the dead donkey of marketing, then why is everyone still talking about it?

What it comes down to are the numbers. Does it actually work? Not just in terms of traffic, likes and shares but does engaging in SEO actually drive more revenue? Well, that would be a clear yes. Take for example Equators work for Health-on-line that saw an increase of 500% in visit-to-lead conversions, providing a tidy £400,000 extra in revenue, and there are plenty more examples that showcase our work.

It comes down to this: as long as there are search engines, people will want, nay need, their websites to be optimised for them. Otherwise you’re going to be left behind.

(And if you want a hand with some SEO, you know where we are)

By Kathryn McKelvie, SEO Executive