Knowing me, knowing when, knowing where, knowing why, knowing you… Aha!

Semantic search sounds kinda sexy, don’t you think? Or have Google taken a leaf out of George Orwell’s 1984 – becoming a little like BIG BROTHER? Could they even be imitating the James Bond nemesis Elliot Carver in ‘Tomorrow Never Dies’ – is it all about providing tomorrows searches today?

Semantic search sounds kinda sexy, don't you think? Or have Google taken a leaf out of George Orwell's 1984 - becoming a little like BIG BROTHER? Could they even be imitating the James Bond nemesis Elliot Carver in 'Tomorrow Never Dies' - is it all about providing tomorrows searches today?

Here's an example, from a personal perspective: recently my daughter Libby had two birthday parties on the same Saturday. Both of these were on my phone's calendar. So it knows when I'm free. The phone also has a GPS system, so it knows where I am at all times during the day. Being the typical father (leaving everything to the last minute) I still have to pick up presents for the birthday parties, and also find something for me and Libby to do in between times.

Now, imagine if all this information was available to my search engine, making our relationship more up close and personal. The search engine should now be able to tell me when I am near a shop that stocks suitable gifts for my daughter's friends! It should also suggest somewhere to have a spot of lunch, as it already knows what food I like, at a time when I am free. A search engine that plans your day… that's partly Semantic Search… that's - potentially, at least -Google.

From a business perspective it'll become even more important for companies to keep their website finely tuned and up to date with Google. This means that businesses themselves will have to be more intuitive and responsive - semantic search will mean businesses having to think harder in making their digital offerings that little bit more special.

Why? Because with semantic search the, search engines would aim to supply the user with a single defining answer to a query. No, it won't give a definitive answer to people asking the meaning of life! Although if it could, it would. So the big question, then, is … "if there's only one answer to a search request, how do businesses make sure that theirs is the one?"

This is still a very big unknown. And what effect this will have on businesses remains a mystery. It's important now more than ever for businesses to make sure their website's finely tuned with the best keywords for search, and that their metadata, digital advertising and marketing strategies are all perfectly optimised for this potential new development in search. The answer lies in businesses ensuring that the web positioning of their company is answering the question that their product/services solve. And it needs to do this clearly, succinctly and engagingly. Providing that "Voilà" moment for its searchers...

Imagine the possibilities as you sit back in your Google car … and enjoy the ride.

Can I have one please?